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May 6, 2011  |  Announcements, Cytobank

A New Way to Publish Data: Cytobank Reports

We’re excited to announce Cytobank Reports, a new feature on Cytobank that will soon enable users to “publish” their data and findings. We’re also excited to announce that the first Cytobank Report (available here) features the mass cytometry study published today in Science, reporting on the simultaneous measurement of 34 parameters in single hematopoietic cells.

Also, more details to come, but stay tuned for a new resource from BD Biosciences powered by Cytobank Reports.

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May 6, 2011  |  Flow Cytometry

Mass Cytometry: Vaporizing Cells in the Name of Science

Mass cytometry, a technique developed by DVS Sciences, now a Fluidigm Company represents a revolutionary spin on classic fluorescence-based flow cytometry. Instead of using antibodies tagged with fluorophores (in which spectral overlap quickly limits the number of parameters available for simultaneous detection), mass cytometry relies on antibodies tagged with transition element isotopes. Antibody-bound cells are vaporized, ionized, and analyzed on a mass spectrometer.

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April 9, 2011  |  Cytobank, Flow Cytometry

Cytometry in the Cloud

At Cytobank, we do cytometry in the “cloud”. What does that mean and how can that help you?

  • Surviving the Data deluge
  • Clarity, Access, and Collaboration
  • Security and Back-up

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April 9, 2011  |  Cytobank, Education, Flow Cytometry

Teaching Phospho-Flow… in France

Dataset #5002: Timecourse LACI 2011

This January, Jonathan and Chris from Cytobank traveled to Marseilles, France to help lead a course as part of the Luminy Advanced Course in Immunology (LACI). LACI is organized as a satellite meeting to the Immunology and Metabolism meeting and organized by the Centre d’Immunlogie de Marseille-Luminy (CIML) and the European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO).

The ‘Cell Signaling’ course at LACI was taught by local instructors Nathalie Auphan-Anezin and Pierre Grenot, both of CIML, and Jonathan and Chris. The course led course participants through staining, collection, upload, and analysis of a phospho-flow experiment. We’ve briefly described the experiment here, made a version of the dataset public along with the original course protocol, and prepared a tutorial (part 1 and part 2) to lead you through Cytobank analysis of the course data.

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April 8, 2011  |  Cytobank

How to Justify an iPad in Your Grant

Recently, some folks were asking on the Purdue Cytometry list about cytometry data analysis on the iPad. We’re happy to say that Cytobank does a great job of enabling you to view your cytometry data on the iPad and iPhone. We’ve just rolled out some changes that make it even easier.

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April 6, 2011  |  Announcements

Upcoming Meetings: May 2011

Two big meetings are on our calendar for May. Are you attending either of these? If so, come say hello and tell us how you use Cytobank to share and analyze your flow data.

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April 5, 2011  |  Cytobank

That Funny Looking Black-and-White Box

You may have noticed a little black-and-white box in the top right corner of your printed Illustrations. This box is a two-dimensional barcode called a QR code.

The QR code for every printed Illustration from Cytobank encodes:

  • Name of Experiment
  • Name of Illustration
  • Link to Illustration (print view)

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February 25, 2011  |  Cytobank, Education, Flow Cytometry

Immunophenotyping Tumor-Infiltrating T cells

Dataset #4659: Testing Set – T Cell Immunophenotype (trimmed)

Quantifying the percentage of cells expressing a protein of interest is a frequent goal in both basic research and clinical studies. Paired with per-cell comparisons of the level of protein expression, this approach provides a powerful way to track and immunophenotype populations of cells present in a particular sample.

One widely recognized application of flow cytometric immunophenotyping is determining the percentage of CD4+ cells in a gated lymphocyte population in order to determine prognosis for an HIV patient. Other applications include measuring a series of markers in order to distinguish between different forms of leukemia.

In Cytobank, you can use the “percent in gate” statistic to measure and display the percentage of cells in a selected gate as compared to each active population in your figure. To illustrate with a simple example, let’s examine a sample dataset looking at the percentage of CD25+ cells in a CD3+ T cell population.

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