May 30, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Harris Fienberg

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Harris Fienberg, a Ph.D. candidate in the Nolan Lab at Stanford University. Harris’s most recent publication features his work developing a cell viability detection protocol for mass cytometry using a platinum-based reagent. You can view and analyze the data firsthand via his Cytobank Report.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Harris Fienberg – Graduate Student, Nolan Lab, Stanford University
Over the last 30 years we’ve gained an extraordinary understanding of the molecular components that make up cellular signaling cascades. However, we’re just beginning to understand how the various components of the cell work together to integrate signals and relay these signals to form phenotypic outcomes. I’m interested in gaining a more holistic understanding of cellular communication. In the future I believe that specific proteins will be seen less in the context of certain signaling pathways and more as words that the cell uses to make a message. I think that reaching this more comprehensive understanding of cellular signaling will be more about about integrating data with smart data analytics than gaining more and more “-omics” style data sets. More »
April 18, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Joshua Brody, M.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Joshua Brody, M.D., Director of the Lymphoma Immunotherapy Program at Mount Sinai School of Medicine. Joshua’s recent publications include his studies showing that in situ vaccination with a TLR9 agonist induces systemic anti-lymphoma clinical responses, as well as his studies using immunotransplant to preferrentially expand T-effector cells to cure large lymphoma tumors.

Send us feedback and let us know who you’d like to hear from (including yourself)!

What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?

Joshua Brody, M.D. Director of Lymphoma Immunotherapy – Mount Sinai
I’m excited about the fact that FINALLY we are really learning how to use the immune system to make cancers shrink and let patients live longer.  For years, tumor immunologists and ‘immunotherapists’ have thought: “This should work.  We should be able to make this work!”, but every year our understanding of the complexity of the immune system has become clearer.  Finally, that understanding is being translated into therapies that help patients with cancer.  We have seen it with melanoma and prostate cancer in the past 2 years and we clearly see even more powerful therapies on the near-horizon.
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March 13, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Ernesto Diaz-Flores, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Ernesto Diaz-Flores, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in Mignon Loh’s lab and previously in Kevin Shannon’s lab, both located at UCSF. Ernesto’s recent publications include his contributions to studies of p53 loss in acute myeloid leukemia, STAT5 activation in myeloid malignancies, and K-Ras(G12D) expression in primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Ernesto Diaz-Flores, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow – Shannon Lab UCSF

Science is a very exciting field because every new question represents a new challenge. As a scientist, my biggest contribution would be to tease out the biochemical mechanisms leading to leukemia and use that information to predict therapeutic responses prior to subjecting the patient to the treatment.
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February 21, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: June Myklebust, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview June Myklebust, Ph.D., a project leader in Erland Smeland’s lab at Oslo University Hospital and former postdoctoral fellow in the Levy Lab at Stanford. June’s recent publications include her contributions to studies on B-cell signaling networks in lymphoma and her work on bone morphogenetic proteins in B cell suppression.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
June Myklebust, Ph.D.
Project Leader, Smeland lab
Oslo University Hospital
New discoveries that change our current biological models or change our view of what can be done in terms of therapeutic options. My scientific goal is to make discoveries from which patients can benefit. One of the challenges in cancer therapy today is to understand the molecular mechanisms for how patients develop fatal drug resistance. In the era of personalized medicine, development of in vitro assays with predictive power for drug-responsiveness, which then can guide the choice of therapy, would also be highly beneficial. I believe the ability to detect tumor cell heterogeneity will be crucial to address these issues, and therefore platforms for large-scale single cell measurements likely will be tiebreakers.

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January 23, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Sean Bendall, Ph.D.

Welcome to our inaugural issue of Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

First up is Sean Bendall, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in Garry Nolan’s lab at Stanford University. Sean’s recent publications include his work on mass cytometry as well as SPADE (available in hosted models of Cytobank).

We’d be happy to hear what you think. Send us feedback and let us know who you’d like to hear from (including yourself)!

What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Sean Bendall, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral fellow, Nolan lab
Stanford University
The thought of finding new biological paradigms is what gets me most excited.  There are many basic things in life that happen (biologically / biochemically – that is) which we take for granted.  However the underlying mechanism of many of these is completely unknown to us, and thus when they go awry we have little recourse to address them therapeutically.  Currently, in the context of the human genome, we really only have a grasp on about 20% of what’s there.  My overriding goal would be to develop methods / systems to help rapidly fill in this knowledge gap.  Because of the complexity (heterogeneity) of the human system, I believe that single-cell approaches will be best in addressing this and therefore my work will only put an increasing demand on analysis platforms to accommodate it.

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