June 26, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Alyssa Hasty, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Alyssa Hasty, Ph.D., an Associate Professor in the Molecular Physiology and Biophysics Department and Director of Graduate Studies at Vanderbilt University.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
AHasty1
Alyssa Hasty, Ph.D. – Vanderbilt University

I am particularly excited about the new field of immunometabolism.  It’s only been in the past decade that we have begun to understand how the immune system interacts with parenchymal cells in metabolic tissue to affect their function.  It has been known for a long time that macrophages are resident cells in many different tissues; however, their role in homeostasis and dysregulated homeostasis is just coming to the forefront.  My lab studies macrophages in the adipose tissue; however, almost every type of immune cell can be found in adipose tissue and their numbers and proportions change between lean and obese situations.  The intracellular communication between immune cells has been the focus of the immunology field for decades.  Likewise, metabolic regulation of adipocytes, myocytes, and hepatocytes has been the focus of the metabolism field.  In science, new ground is broken when scientists from different fields begin to interact.  This is now beginning to happen between immunologist and physiologists, and the results are incredibly exciting!

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May 15, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Regina Cheung, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Regina K. Cheung, Ph.D., Associate Disease Area Manager (Peripheral Arterial Disease, Obesity, and Stroke) at Cardiovascular Resource Group. Regina performed her doctoral work in the laboratory of Dr. Paul Utz at Stanford Univeristy.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Regina K. Cheung, Ph.D. - Cardiovascular Resource Group
Regina K. Cheung, Ph.D. – Cardiovascular Resource Group

I love science because it helps us to understand the world around us, and more importantly, the world within us. I originally trained as an engineer, but eventually realized that as much fun as it was to build robots, I am even more fascinated by the conundrum that is understanding how living beings are built. As we unravel how the amazing system that is the human body works, we can use this knowledge to develop therapeutics. More »

February 28, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Eric Padron, M.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Eric Padron, M.D., Clinical Instructor at the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center. Dr. Padron is in the laboratory of PK Epling-Burnette in the division of Malignant Hematology.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Eric Padron M.D. - Moffitt Cancer Center
Eric Padron M.D. – Moffitt Cancer Center

The genomic age has given investigators an unprecedented window in to the molecular abnormalities within cancer cells. Through this window, we see that there are many molecular abnormalities, some occurring in divergent pathways. As a physician-scientist I am most interested in identifying which of these pathways are required for cancer cell viability/proliferation and leveraging this information for the design of genomically targeted pharmaceuticals in clinical trials. More »
January 28, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Sarah Tasian, M.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Sarah Tasian, M.D., Attending Physician and Instructor in the Division of Oncology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She is part of the Grupp lab and co-mentored by Martin Carroll, M.D. Her recent publications include her work studying STAT5 and PI3K/mTOR signaling in B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells (ALL) and studying the effects of JAK and mTOR inhibition in B-precursor ALL mouse xenografts.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Sarah Tasian, M.D. Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
Sarah Tasian, M.D. – Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
With modern genomic and proteomic technologies, we are truly embarking upon the era of personalized medicine!
My long-term career goal as a translational physician-scientist in pediatric oncology is to develop better therapies, improve cure rates, and minimize toxicities for children with high-risk leukemias. In the laboratory, I study perturbations of signal transduction networks in genetic subtypes of pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with the goal of identification of relevant targets for novel targeted therapies. I use specialized immunocompromised murine xenograft models of childhood ALL and AML for the preclinical testing of relevant signal transduction inhibitor (STIs) and of newer chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T cell immunotherapy. I use phosphoflow cytometry to study signal transduction in primary patient leukemia samples and to measure molecular responses to STIs in vitro and in vivo. I am also involved in the testing of STIs in children with relapsed leukemias via Phase I clinical trials through the Children’s Oncology Group. Successful development of these laboratory and clinical research strategies will ultimately allow me to lead a translational research program in developmental therapeutics for children with clinically high-risk leukemias. More »
November 30, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Bernd Bodenmiller, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Bernd Bodenmiller, Ph.D., Group Leader in Systems Biology at the Institute of Molecular Life Sciences at the University of Zurich. His recent publications include his work using mass cytometry to profile cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators, as well as his contributions towards developing a viability reagent for mass cytometry. Both of these datasets are publicly available via Cytobank:

Cytobank Report: Multiplexed mass cytometry profiling of cellular states perturbed by small-molecule regulators

Cytobank Report: A platinum-based covalent viability reagent for single cell mass cytometry

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?

Bernd Bodenmiller, Ph.D.University of Zurich
Bernd Bodenmiller, Ph.D.
University of Zurich
Anything that broadens or changes our perspective on what we assumed so far as “truth”. E.g. for a long time we assumed that signaling pathways are linear. While this might be still true for some cases, novel omics measurement techniques that allow a global view on signaling events now illustrate that cellular signaling is highly complex and interwoven in networks. To broaden our view and understanding of biological systems, we
should strive to develop novel analysis technologies, as they have the power to trigger new research fields.

My vision? I would love to see non-invasive measurement technologies like in Star Trek to scan a person and allow us to determine a health profile within seconds. Sounds crazy, isn’t it? But when Star Trek the original series was aired the first time, everybody thought it was “science fiction” that Spock and colleagues used little devices that fit into their hands to talk to each over long distances and to retrieve information. Now nearly everyone has one of these…

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October 30, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Erin Simonds, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Erin Simonds, Ph.D., a Postdoctoral Scholar in the W. A. Weiss Lab in the Department of Neurology at the University of California San Francisco. His recent publications include his work on mass cytometry to study human hematopoietic cells, as well as his work developing a viability reagent for mass cytometry. Both of these datasets are publicly available on Cytobank:

Cytobank Report: Single-Cell Mass Cytometry of Differential Immune and Drug Responses Across a Human Hematopoietic Continuum

Cytobank Report: A platinum-based covalent viability reagent for single cell mass cytometry

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
 
Erin Simonds, Ph.D. (W.A. Weiss Lab – UCSF)
I work on cancer, both because it is a pressing societal need and because it is at the intersection of several areas of biology that really fascinate me:  Biochemistry, stem cells, immunology, and therapeutic design.  This is an exciting time in cancer research because the era of personalized medicine is well underway, with dozens of molecular-targeted drugs already in the clinic, and many dozens more in pharmaceutical pipelines.  I believe single-cell technologies (flow cytometry and, more recently, mass cytometry) will be essential for deciphering the phenotypic heterogeneity of these cancers, and identifying therapies that kill the “root” of the cancer — the cancer stem cells.
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September 21, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Anders Egeland

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Anders Egeland, a medical student in the Taskén group at the The Biotechnology Center of Oslo at the University of Oslo.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Anders Egeland, University of Oslo

Science is exciting as it’s full of unsolved questions, and answers to some of these questions can often be translated into therapies in the long term. As an ever-increasing body of knowledge continues to accumulate within the medical domain, more advanced methods from other research fields such as mathematics and physics are needed to understand the complex biological relationships. I aim to combine these fields to gain new insights. Hopefully, in the future MDs will be able to use these computational techniques, e.g. SPADE provided by Cytobank, in the clinic when they assess the clinical status of a patient.
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August 29, 2012  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Jørn Skavland

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow cytometry.

This time we interview Jørn Skavland, a Ph.D. candidate in the Hematology Research Laboratory at the Haukeland University Hospital affiliated with the University of Bergen. Jørn’s recent publications include his studies on signal transduction in acute myeloid leukemia as well as his work understanding the spleen microenvironment upon endotoxin exposure.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Jørn Skavland, University of Bergen

Like most people I’m fascinated by how things are built and how they work. Having the possibility to dig into details of the scientific world is very interesting. I like to look at cell signaling like a great road-map and the traffic situation in the morning rush. It’s easy to find the main roads going to the city center, but zooming in you’ll see the complexity. With the upcoming knowledge of cell signaling, I believe in using signaling readouts to predict the best treatment option for a patient.

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