April 7, 2014  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Kanutte Huse, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of fluorescence and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Kanutte Huse, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Currently, Kanutte is a visiting research fellow in the Irish lab at Vanderbilt University.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Kanutte Huse,
Kanutte Huse,
 Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow at Oslo University Hospital

The short answer is everything. I’m impressed by how natural scientists can measure and model everything around us, continuously increasing our knowledge about the world. More specifically, I’m interested in understanding the signaling networks of cells, and it fascinates me how seemingly simple signaling pathways can regulate a range of functional outcomes. I want to understand how alterations in signaling pathways lead to cancer. More »

March 24, 2014  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Stéphane Chevrier

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of fluorescence and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Stéphane Chevrier, Ph.D., a Research Associate from the Institute of Molecular Life Sciences at University of Zurich.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Stéphane Chevrier,
Stéphane Chevrier, Ph.D.
University of Zurich

Science is particularly exciting because we have the opportunity to understand new biological processes with the potential of changing peoples’ lives. Therefore, I really appreciate working on translational projects. And when new technical advances or new biological tools enable us to address questions that could not be solved before, it becomes even more interesting!
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February 28, 2014  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Olga Ksionda, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of fluorescence and mass cytometry. This time we interview Olga Ksionda, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scholar in the lab of Jeroen Roose in the Department of Anatomy at the UCSF School of Medicine. Send us feedback and let us know who you’d like to hear from (including yourself)!

What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Olga Ksionda, Ph.D.
Olga Ksionda, Ph.D.
UCSF School of Medicine

I am very much interested in understanding the molecular aspects of T cell development, especially in pathological settings when wrong decisions are “made” and T cells become autoimmune or malignant.

In general terms, I have always found it fascinating when unrelated fields cross fertilize with unexpected outcomes. I consider some of the best examples of this the Cre system or recently described CRISPR technology.

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January 23, 2014  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Hervé Luche, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of fluorescence and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Hervé Luche, Ph.D., R&D Manager at the Centre d’Immunophénomique in Marseilles, France.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Herve Luche,
Herve Luche, Ph.D.

I am very much interested in trying to understand how cells integrate signals and communicate with their environment to actually change their transcriptional programs, fate or acquire a new function. To try to tackle down this complexity in biology, one necessarily needs multi-disciplinary approaches and to combine multiple-expertise. I like sharing ideas with other people of different scientific backgrounds to establish new models and theories. The most exciting part of the work to me is when you bring all pieces of the puzzle together and that your model becomes partly true and clarifies one scientific question. It does not happen very often (to me at least!) but when it does, it is great fun!
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November 15, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Adam Litterman

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Adam Litterman, a Ph.D. Candidate of the Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology graduate program in Dr. David Largaespada’s lab at the University of Minnesota. Some of his work was recently published in the Journal of Immunology and was analyzed using Cytobank.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Adam Litterman - Ph.D. student at University of Minnesota
Adam Litterman – Ph.D. student at University of Minnesota

I am excited about understanding how gene expression is controlled in T cells. This is for a couple reasons. First of all, T cells have a hand in a large number of disease processes: autoimmunity, infectious diseases, vaccinations, cancer, etc., all these diseases could see improved outcomes stemming from better understanding of how T cells work. Second, T cells are an exciting, emerging new type of therapeutic, different in kind from regular drugs or biologics, for cancer and other diseases too. Finally, T cells are a great model system for understanding cellular differentiation and plasticity: naive T cells can take on a number of fairly well characterized fates based on information from their environment. I see a lot of work left to do to try to understand how T cells make those decisions, and ultimately to try to manipulate those decisions for therapeutic purposes. More »

September 30, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Emilie Decaup

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Emilie Decaup, a Ph.D. Student at Toulouse University whose work on follicular lymphoma was recently published in the Journal of Blood Cancer.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Emilie Decaup - Ph.D. Student at Toulouse University
Emilie Decaup – Ph.D. Student at Toulouse University

I am really excited by cancer research. There is so much to do and to discover particularly for therapy. It is a domain in perpetual evolution with ever new therapeutic targets and drugs. Technological advances in biomedical research allow us to learn more. Flow cytometry is a technique that I particularly appreciate because it is really powerful especially for studying mechanisms of action of therapeutic agents like monoclonal antibodies. New technical approaches like fluorescent cell barcoding simplify experiments with lot of samples and allow straightforward drug screening. I think that technological advances will allow researchers to be more efficient. More »

August 31, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Manfred Claassen, Ph.D.

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Manfred Claassen, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor for Computational Biology at the Institute for Molecular Systems Biology at ETH Zurich, Switzerland.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Manfred Claassen, Ph.D. - Assistant Professor ETH Zurich
Manfred Claassen, Ph.D. – Assistant Professor ETH Zurich

I am deeply impressed by the power of interdisciplinary approaches to elegantly, concisely and yet conclusively describe seemingly overwhelming complex biological phenomena and diseases by means of well-established scientific and sound mathematical principles. We are living in a time where the technological advances in biology enable us to map out these phenomena at ever increasing breadth and resolution. I believe that in the future we will be able to generically make use of these technologies to routinely draw scientific conclusions or design clinical interventions. To achieve this goal we still have to develop an appropriate language to describe and simulate complex biological systems at the right scale. It will be exciting to contribute to this endeavor. More »

July 31, 2013  |  User Stories

Cytobank User Stories: Benjamin Spurgeon

Welcome to Cytobank User Stories, a series featuring interviews with Cytobank users on their research, scientific vision, and use of flow and mass cytometry.

This time we interview Benjamin Spurgeon a PhD student in Professor Khalid Naseem’s Thrombosis & Hemostasis Research Laboratory at the Centre for Cardiovascular and Metabolic Research, Hull York Medical School, Hull, UK.

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What are you excited about in science? What is your scientific vision?
Benjamin Spurgeon - PhD student
Benjamin Spurgeon – PhD student

I am particularly excited about the development of methods for the identification of novel therapeutic agents. Flow cytometry provides a powerful platform for drug screening because of its inherent capability to discern specific cell populations from heterogeneous mixtures. Using flow cytometry, we can therefore evaluate the efficacy of drug compounds in the physiologic milieu of whole blood. Additionally, flow cytometry can be (and is being) used to assess the efficacy of therapeutic regimens. My vision concerns the development of flow cytometry systems suitable for rapid and convenient monitoring of drug therapies. More »